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    Oil and Gas Training Courses SLB NEXT

    Food Safety in Manufacturing Level 3

    Course Objective

    • The objective of this qualification is to prepare learners for employment or to support a current position within a low-risk role, where there is an element of food handling. This could include bar workers, waiting staff, health care workers, kitchen porters, and stock/store room staff. Learners gaining this qualification will know that food safety is the responsibility of everyone involved in the storage, preparation, processing, packing, and handling of food. This course ensures that employees from all food sectors are equipped with a knowledge of food hygiene to enable them to produce safe food.
    The following points shall be discussed in the course:
    • Understand personal responsibilities for food safety in a catering environment
    • Understand the importance of personal hygiene in a catering environment
    • Understand the importance of keeping work areas clean and hygienic in a catering environment
    • Understand how to keep food safe in a manufacturing environment
    Activities
    • Classroom with Theoretical and Handouts for classwork

    Day 1 
    Session 1 - Course Introduction  
    Session 2 – Understand the requirements for ensuring compliance with food safety legislation and management procedures

    • Recognize the importance of implementing food safety management procedures 
    • Recognize the responsibilities of those working in a manufacturing environment in respect of food safety legislation and procedures for compliance 
    • Identify the process for applying a food safety management system into a food business 
    • Identify methods for, and the importance of, verifying food safety controls and procedures 
    • Recognize the responsibilities of those working in a manufacturing environment when identifying and selecting suitable controls and monitoring, to prevent food safety hazards from purchase to service 
    Session 3 – Understand the application and monitoring of good practice regarding contamination, temperature control, personal hygiene, and cleaning
    • Identify the process of implementing and maintaining high standards of personal hygiene within a manufacturing operation
    • Recognize the requirements for induction and ongoing training of staff to ensure competency
    • Identify the process of implementing procedures for cleaning, disinfection, and waste disposal
    • Identify the actions that need to be taken with regard to pest control
    • Recognize the responsibilities of those working in a manufacturing environment when identifying hazards posed by, and procedures to control microbiological, chemical, physical, and allergenic contamination
    • Recognize the importance of, and methods for temperature control within a food manufacturing process
    Session 4 – Recognize the importance of personal hygiene in food safety including their role in reducing the risk of contamination
    • How good personal hygiene in a food manufacturing environment can reduce microbial, chemical, physical, and allergenic contamination

    Day 2
    Session 5 – Recognize the importance of implementing food safety management procedures

    • Food hygiene/safety 
    • Food poisoning 
    • Food safety hazard 
    • Food safety management system
    • Contamination 
    • Cross-contamination 
    • Causative agent 
    • Food vehicle 
    • Incubation/onset time 
    • Pathogen 
    • Common symptoms
    Session 6 – Recognise the responsibilities of those working in a manufacturing environment in respect of food safety legislation and procedures for compliance
    • Recognize the responsibilities of those working in a manufacturing environment in respect of food safety legislation and procedures for compliance:
    • Awareness of requirements for HACCP based procedures 
    • Temperature control 
    • Contamination 
    • Handling practices 
    • Personal hygiene 
    • Cleaning and disinfection
    • The role of those working in a manufacturing environment in internal and external food safety inspections/audits 
    • The role of those working in a manufacturing environment in dealing with food complaints, food poisoning allegations, and investigations
    • The role of those working in a manufacturing environment during a food safety inspection Importance of accompanying enforcement officers 
    • The importance of accurate written records 
    • The potential consequences of non-compliance or the prosecution of a manufacturing business and awareness of the penalties that can be applied to both food handlers and food business operators for non-compliance with food safety legislation 
    • Due diligence defense

    Day 3 
    Session 7 – Identify the process for applying a food safety management system into a food business
    Food safety management systems 

    • The importance of identifying hazards, control measures, monitoring actions, corrective actions, verification and validation, and documentation at steps in the manufacturing process which are critical to food safety
    • Responsibilities and daily activities of food handlers and supervisors to implement and monitor food safety practices and procedures, including opening and closing checks o Role of those working in a manufacturing environment in ensuring appropriate corrective actions for deviations from control points in food production, including supervisory actions to take when performance does not achieve standards and targets 
    • The importance of providing feedback to those responsible for the food safety procedures and the types of issues you need to address 
    • The importance of up-to-date, accurate documentation and records, and examples of the type of records that may be used in a manufacturing business
    Session 8 – Recognise the responsibilities of those working in a manufacturing environment when identifying and selecting suitable controls and monitoring, to prevent food safety hazards from purchase to service
    • Implementing and monitoring controls to minimize hazards from delivery and unloading o The importance of clear labeling of food 
    • Ensuring and monitoring food storage conditions are suitable and specify the temperatures required for different food 
    • Why stock rotation procedures are important Distinguish between ‘Use By’ and ‘Best Before’ date codes and explain why food past its code must be disposed of 
    • Role of those working in a manufacturing environment in implementing and controls at the stages of thawing, preparation, cooking, cooling, reheating, holding, and serving food
    Session 9 – Understand the application and monitoring of good practice regarding contamination, temperature control, personal hygiene, and cleaning
    • Identify the process of implementing and maintaining high standards of personal hygiene within a manufacturing operation
    • Handling practices 
    • Protective clothing 
    • Fitness to Work, including the relevance of the term ‘carrier’ 
    • Role of those working in a manufacturing environment in securing high standards of personal hygiene
    • Open wounds and first aid dressings
    • Hand washing facilities that should be provided in a manufacturing environment, and how these facilities can be managed and monitored on a day to day basis 
    • Common barriers to effective handwashing, how to overcome these to ensure food handlers wash hands effectively at appropriate times, and how this can be monitored 
    • The importance of implementing and enforcing systems regarding the reporting of illness and infections promptly, and actions to be taken if a food handler poses a threat to the safety of the food, including the terms ‘healthy’ and ‘convalescent’ carrier
    Session 10 – Recognise the requirements for induction and ongoing training of staff to ensure competency
    • The objectives and benefits of food safety training to ensure competency 
    • The importance of training records 
    • How to communicate standards and procedures to staff 
    • How to assess the competency of staff
    Session 11 – Identify how to report food safety hazards, infestations, and food spoilage
    • What to report, when to report, who to report to with regards to:
    • Hazards, infestations/signs of pests, and spoilage in a food manufacturing environment

    Day 4
    Session 12 – Identify the process of implementing procedures for cleaning, disinfection, and waste disposal
    • Definitions of:
    • Cleaning 
    • Bactericide 
    • Detergent
    • Disinfectant 
    • Disinfection 
    • Sanitizer 
    • Sanitization 
    • Biodegradable 
    • Contact time  
    • The reasons for cleaning 
    • How cleaning processes can be effectively supervised, including the use of cleaning schedules 
    • The steps involved in cleaning and disinfecting or in sanitizing 
    • The importance of using the correct equipment, utensils, and chemicals when cleaning 
    • Safety precautions that should be considered when storing chemicals and cleaning, and when disinfecting work areas or equipment 
    • The hazards associated with poor cleaning 
    • The difference between ‘clean as you go’ and ‘scheduled cleaning’ 
    • Typical areas in a manufacturing operation that will require cleaning, disinfecting, and/or sanitizing 
    • The hazards associated with incorrect waste management 
    • How to clear and dispose of waste safely
    Session 13 – Recognize the main risks to food safety from contamination and cross-contamination from microbial, chemical, physical, and allergenic hazards
    • Meaning of terms contamination, cross-contamination, raw food to be cooked, high-risk food, low-risk food, and ready-to-eat raw food 
    • Types of microbiological contaminants (bacteria, virus, mold) 
    • Common sources, routes, and vehicles of microbiological contamination in a food manufacturing environment 
    • Recognition of main characteristics of food poisoning bacteria, factors influencing microbiological multiplication and survival (including spores and toxins), and consequences these may have for food safety and basic controls 
    • Examples of basic controls to prevent microbiological contamination, include keeping raw and ready to eat separate, separate areas/sections for food production, use of correct equipment to prevent contamination (including color coding), reporting damaged equipment, including work surfaces 
    • Examples of common physical hazards within food preparation areas and basic controls 
    • Examples of common chemical hazards within food preparation areas and basic controls 
    • Identification of common allergenic foods and risks associated with allergenic hazards. 
    • Awareness of ways to prevent allergenic contamination during food production and allergen controls within food manufacturing
    Session 13 – Identify the actions that need to be taken with regard to pest control
    • Common food pests 
    • The main signs of pest infestations 
    • Why food pests are a hazard to food safety 
    • The role of those working in a manufacturing environment in preventing the access and harbourage of pests and in implementing suitable control measures
    • The role of those working in a manufacturing environment in pest management
    Session 14 – Recognise the responsibilities of those working in a manufacturing environment when identifying hazards posed by, and procedures to control microbiological, chemical, physical, and allergenic contamination
    • Microbiological hazards posed by
    • Raw food
    • High-risk foods
    • Low-risk foods
    • Raw ready-to-eat raw foods
    • Sources of contamination hazards
    • The different types of microbes of interest to the food industry, including pathogens, low
    • dose pathogens, spoilage, and beneficial
    • The principal causes of microbiological multiplication and survival
    • How good design can help avoid cross-contamination through workflow and layout
    Session 15 – Recognise the importance of, and methods for temperature control within a food manufacturing process
    • Factors that influence the multiplication of food poisoning bacteria 
    • The terms ‘bacterial spore’ and toxin 
    • The conditions under which spores and toxins are formed and the consequences these may have for food safety 
    • The temperatures which support the most rapid multiplication of food poisoning bacteria
    • Suitable temperatures and/or timescales for thawing, cooking, cooling, and reheating alongside hot and cold holding of food. 
    • Methods of minimizing and preventing bacterial multiplication including the need for good ventilation 
    • The methods used to destroy food poisoning bacteria in food
    • Correct use, and simple methods of, validating the accuracy of thermometers

    • Aimed at individuals who intend to be food handlers working in manufacturing.


    Topics Covered:
    • The importance of food safety in a catering environment Worker’s Responsibilities
    • Legal Responsibilities of Food Handlers for Food Safety
    • Reporting food safety hazards to supervisors
    • Importance of Personal Hygiene in a Catering Environment
    • Importance of Housekeeping and keeping work areas clean in a catering environment
    • Safe Work Environment
    • How to keep food safe in a catering environment

    • Previous experience in the food catering industry.


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